Posted on Sun, 02 Dec, 2018
Posted by Declan

Harking back to the past with a firm outlook on the future, Yamaha is capturing the current audio-consumption zeitgeist, alongside compatibility with their Multi-room system in the home. The latest generation of vinyl consumers are at a standpoint where an old method of listening to music is in-vogue, yet many are accustomed to the latest, modern marvels of accessing music too. Yamaha’s MusicCast Vinyl 500 aims to address the balance, and set a middle ground, for both.

The most modern capabilities

The Yamaha 500 has wireless connectivity. Link up to 2.4 / 5 GHz Wifi and Bluetooth version 4.2, streaming compatibility readily built-in, with all the digital heavyweights: Spotify, Apple Music, Napster, Tidal, Deezer, Pandora, along with Apple AirPlay. Hooking your phone up to the ‘table is a breeze, which can be especially useful when using the unit as part of MusicCast’s multi-room set, connecting up to two compatible speakers together around the house, creating a dynamic effect. You can thoroughly enjoy your Dad’s original vinyl collection from the comfort of this flattering unit, standalone or connected with the MusicCast app. It allows you to control the audio to your delight from a smartphone – including a friendly user-interface and practical controls. You are no longer bound to your unit to control the music – it can be done from anywhere in the house; even next to a compatible speaker in the upstairs bedroom that is connected via the MultiRoom software and hardware hybrid.

Yamaha Vinyl 500 Turntable Black

As for those who actually want to use the machine for what it is intended for, the vinyl is done justice, with a strong supporting list of specifications. A speed of rotation between 33-1/3 rpm, 45 rpm and a dynamic range of 100 dB or higher, the turntable is as robust as units from time gone-by.The turntable itself it powered by a DC motor, driven by a belt, varied its rotation speed by ±2% (purposely implemented to minis noise disruption caused by record vibrations), a straight tonearm (with static balance), and has an output level of 450 mV.

A proficient unit, it only consumes around 6W (1.8w maximum on stand-by), without output voltage of 2.5 mV.

All look and feature-packed

Yamaha Vinyl 500 Turntable White

Available from Audio Affair in an iteration of black or white (with the white option having a black turntable and stunning metallic, silver arm plus controls), it cuts out the clutter and bulk of former turntables and leaves you with only what matters – the bare minimum, without cutting out any practical or essential elements from the hardware. All of this functionality comes in a friendly 5.7kg weighted auditory appliance. Both of the stunning physical forms that the turntable takes are deliberately intended to blend and compliment each other. Furthermore, the freedom of no cables is even more liberating, practical and a modern feat of technology that still entrenches traditional ways of listening, only now with added simplicity.

How it’s meant to be

The ‘500 blends physical specifications with a form of audio consumption that is regarded amongst avid fans as the ‘most pure’, so it is warmly fitting that the two are now made to to together. Old and new. A list of technical specifications as long as an elephant’s trunk meets the most revered, and not entire unpopular method of listing to audio: vinyl. In essence, this match blends the best of both, then adds well-baked-in digital audio connectivity for further practicality, ensuring not to eschew the most modern and widespread way to connect to music.

A grand plan

The Yamaha 500 in Black with its clear lid raised

The Yamaha 500 in Black with its clear lid raised

The ‘500 is useful, practical, made to work well, and even act as a incredibly diverse piece of auditory equipment. Not just is it a turntable, it is a speaker. Then on top it is an additional, well-connected speaker. All-in-all, Yamaha have struck an incredibly fine balance with accuracy, and even gave listeners something which (perhaps) they did not quite know they wanted.

 

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